I have always recognized in Piero, a rare talent. During some of my conversations with friends and colleagues, I have always said that, although he had been originally predestined for the legal profession, Piero was in actual fact, a greater musician than those predestined to be musicians themselves.
Jazz was his passion. He managed to isolate some very poignant characteristics of this musical language, and apply them to contrasting cinematographic approaches in a very distinctive, coherent, recognizeable and personal way. Spanning from the explicitly modern “Le Mani Sulla Citta”, through the poetry of “Fumo di Londra” to the so subtly beautiful “Amore, amore, amore”, his stylistic imprint is always clear and intelligibile.
Memories of our conversations are always alive in my mind. As Piero began talking, I could never predict where he would go next. Through politics, ethics, paradox, irony and satire, Piero’s mind would always fly in a joyous and freethinking way. As he would end his flight and return to the initial point of conversation, it seemed as though I had journeyed through a deeply cultural, wonderful dream, without it ever being pretentious in any way. Piero has left an enormous void within the hearts those friends who esteemed him, including myself.
Piero, we will meet again, in a exclusively musical world with no hypocrisies such as the ones we may sometimes witness in our terrain lives.

Ennio Morricone

Memorials:
F. Rosi, A. Trovajoli, E. Morricone, A. Mazzoletti, C. Fuiano, M. Cardinaletti, R. Zamori, L. Piccioni, Jason e Valentina Piccioni, A. Casella, E. Comuzio.